Author: staff

Two Pennsylvania men operating NoBull Solutions LLC, a reproductive service for dairies, are in prison following complaints of them practicing veterinary medicine without a license.  On April 10, Rusty Herr, 43, was booked into the Lancaster County Prison. Meanwhile, his business partner, Ethan Wentworth, 33, was sent to the New York County Prison the next day. The Pennsylvania Veterinary Medicine Association alleges in a complaint filed in Harrisburg that they had received reports of illegal practices of veterinary medicine by unlicensed individuals employed by NoBull Solutions.  The complaint details Facebook advertisements of “all-encompassing reproductive management” for dairy farmers.  This isn’t…

Read More

Colorado Parks and Wildlife announced Thursday that a wolf or wolves were behind the deaths of four cattle in Grand County this week. Travis Duncan, CPW’s public information officer, reported that on Wednesday, the agency investigated a depredation incident in Grand County and determined that the injuries on three young cattle were “consistent with wolf attacks.” Although the report was not confirmed until Thursday, officials reported that the depredation likely occurred on Monday or Tuesday during a snowstorm, which concealed the carcasses until they were discovered on Wednesday. Another cattle death was found on Thursday at the same property, and CPW…

Read More

The fungicide’s ADEPIDYN technology helps wheat plants conserve water and remain healthier for longer. Low-moisture seasons can make wheat growers complacent about applying a fungicide to their crop. Troublesome pathogens such as Fusarium are driven by consistent moisture, such as frequent rains or heavy dews, so does that mean skipping a fungicide during drier years is acceptable? Over the past three growing seasons, at least part of the Midwest has been in a drought. In this situation, while the threat from fungi may be reduced, wheat and other small-grain plants face other health hazards. Without adequate moisture, they will shut…

Read More

Drylands in the western United States are currently in the grips of a 23-year “megadrought,” and one West Virginia University researcher is working to gain a better understanding of this extreme climate event. Steve Kannenberg, assistant professor of biology at the WVU Eberly College of Arts and Sciences, is using observations from existing networks of scientific instrument stations across the region to inch toward that goal. The megadrought is an ongoing climate crisis for natural ecosystems, agricultural systems, and human water resources, but researchers have a limited understanding of the phenomenon. With joint National Science Foundation funding from Ecosystem Science…

Read More

Because of concerns over antimicrobial resistance in humans and the public pushback against antimicrobials in livestock feed, the poultry industry is evolving toward more antibiotic-free production techniques to meet market demands. Penn State researchers are helping to identify and better understand alternative approaches. The growing need for antibiotic-free products has challenged producers to decrease or completely stop using antimicrobials as feed supplements in the diet of broiler chickens to improve feed efficiency, growth rate, and intestinal health. Led by Erika Ganda, assistant professor of food animal microbiomes, a Penn State research team conducted a study of natural feed additives that…

Read More

Iowa environmental groups — inspired by a successful campaign in Minnesota — are asking the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to step in and protect drinking water in northeast Iowa from agricultural runoff. The petition was announced this week, hours after the Iowa Environmental Protection Commission unanimously approved largely status quo rules governing animal feeding operations. “The Environmental Protection Commission has once again proven who they really serve — not the Iowa public, but big ag polluters,” said Alicia Vasto, water program manager for the Iowa Environmental Council, one of the 13 groups that filed the petition with the EPA Tuesday.…

Read More

The FFA chapter at Dayton High School in Oregon won a visit from agricultural influencer and TV and radio personality Rob Sharkey, better known by most as SharkFarmer.   The contest was put on by the Virginia-based Propane Education & Research Council, and students could enter while at the 2023 National FFA Convention. The Dayton FFA Chapter stood out because of its dedication to agriculture education and community involvement, including the use of propane for its building heat, generator, forklift, and garden shed — an integral part of the school’s notable ag and horticulture program. There, students manage every step of…

Read More

American Farm Bureau agreed not to support R2R legislation in exchange for consumer repair diagnostics. Farmers and repair advocates say the tools fall short. During the 2023 harvest season, one of Jake Lieb’s tractors quit working. A week later, his combine stopped working, too. Both were new — and he was locked out from making any repairs himself because of software restrictions embedded in the machines. Instead, a technician from John Deere was dispatched to diagnose and repair the problems. While waiting for the technician to come out, Lieb fired up a 20-year-old tractor he hadn’t used for harvesting in…

Read More

More than 15 years after Robert Kenner delivered the documentary Food, Inc., which took hard stances against corporate influence in the American food system and how modern agriculture functions, a follow-up was released on streaming services on April 19. This Food, Inc. 2 review explores how the filmmakers view today’s food production system, where its faults and strengths are, and what are some key discussion points worth revisiting. While the original film redefined a genre of food and farm documentary filmmaking, Food, Inc. 2 lacks much of the punch of its predecessor. That means it’ll not likely be as noteworthy…

Read More

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service announced earlier this month that it would be canceling the July Cattle Report and other crop reports and estimates. “The decision to discontinue these surveys and reports was not made lightly, but was necessary, given appropriated budget levels,” wrote the USDA in the recent notice.  The cancellations have been met with frustration from several industry groups.  Farmers are price takers, not price makers, and have no control over the markets in which their livestock is sold. Market transparency is essential where four companies control 85 percent of the cattle market. “It…

Read More